WWF in Gabon | WWF

WWF in Gabon

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Gabon
© Sinziana Demian / WWF GHoa
Gabon is a stunning country, boasting a 885 km long coastline at the Atlantic Ocean and over 80% forest cover inland. 13 national parks protect a spectacular array of tropical wildlife and some of the most majestic scenery in the world.

The negative impacts of human activities are still small compared to those in many other countries, although there is evidence of an increase in poaching, illegal forest exploitation, agro-industrial activities (oil palm, rubber) and mining. Infrastructure development projects are also on the rise.

Gabon has made a political commitment to conservation and sustainable natural resource management by securing 15% of its territory as protected areas. “Green Gabon” is one of its three strategic pillars: this “green economy” approach includes national land-use planning, developing a system for environmental accounting, and considering greenhouse-gas emissions in development projects.
 

DISCOVER WWF's PROGRAMMES IN GABON

WWF Gabon has four main thematic programmes to catalyse conservation impact on a national scale: Activities focus on three field programmes based on three priority landscapes:

GABON KEY FACTS

Area: 267,667 Km2
Population: 1,534,000 inhabitants
GDP per capita: US$8,600, but more than a third of the population lives on less than US$2 per day
Human Development Index: 0.683 (ranked 106/187, UNDP 2013)
Net Official Development Aid: US$104 million (2010, World Bank)
 
	© WWF Carpo
Gabon
© WWF Carpo

BIODIVERSITY & LANDSCAPE

22 million hectares of forests
700 bird species
198 mammal species
98 amphibian species
Estimated between 95 and 160 reptile species
Estimated 10,000 plant species 
 

NATURAL RESOURCES

Petroleum, natural gas, diamond, niobium, manganese, uranium, gold, timber, iron ore, hydropower.

Slideshow

© Sinziana Demian / WWF GHoa © Sinziana Demian / WWF GHoa © WWF Gabon © Sinziana Demian / WWF GHoa © Martin Harvey / WWF © WWF / James Morgan

MAJOR THREATS TO CONVERSATION

Overlapping land uses and related conflicts
Poaching and illegal trade of ivory, bush meat and protected species
Unsustainable timber exploitation
Industrial and artisanal mining
Insufficient control of hunting activities and quota management in commercial and communal hunting zones 
Commercial agriculture (e.g. unsustainable palm oil plantations/production)